Subliminal manipulation (documentary)


Ruch S, Züst MA, Henke K. Subliminal messages exert long-term effects on decision-making. Neurosci Conscious. 2016 Aug 20;2016(1):niw013. doi: 10.1093/nc/niw013. PMID: 30386634; PMCID: PMC6204644.

  • Farooqui AA, Manly T. Anticipatory control through associative learning of subliminal relations: invisible may be better than visible. Psychol Sci 2015;26:325–34. 10.1177/0956797614564191. [PubMed] [CrossRef] []
  • Ferrand L. The masked repetition priming effect dissipates when increasing the inter-stimulus interval: evidence from word naming. Acta Psychologica 1996;91:15–25. 10.1016/0001-6918(95)00010-0. [CrossRef] []
  • Forster K, Booker J, Schacter DL, et al. Masked repetition priming: lexical activation or novel memory trace? Bull Psychon Soc 1990;28:341–5. 10.3758/BF03334039. [CrossRef] []
  • Gaillard R, Cohen L, Adam C, et al. Subliminal words durably affect neuronal activity. NeuroReport 2007;18:1527–31. 10.1097/WNR.0b013e3282f0b6cd. [PubMed] [CrossRef] []
  • García-Orza J, Damas-López J, Matas A, et al. “2 x 3” primes naming “6”: evidence from masked priming. Atten Percept Psychophys 2009;71:471–80. 10.3758/APP.71.3.471 [PubMed] [CrossRef] []
  • Greene AJ, Gross WL, Elsinger CL, et al. An fMRI analysis of the human hippocampus: inference, context, and task awareness. J Cogn Neurosci 2006;18:1156–73. 10.1162/jocn.2006.18.7.1156 [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] []

Related information:
patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/e2/4e/f9/3d4d57e738f8c2/US6506148.pdf

Corona related patents (injectable devices, nanoscale wires, neural probes)

Systems and methods for injectable devices
Abstract
The present invention generally relates to nanoscale wires and/or injectable devices. In some embodiments, the present invention is directed to electronic devices that can be injected or inserted into soft matter, such as biological tissue or polymeric matrixes. For example, the device may be passed through a syringe or a needle. In some cases, the device may comprise one or more nanoscale wires. Other components, such as fluids or cells, may also be injected or inserted. In addition, in some cases, the device, after insertion or injection, may be connected to an external electrical circuit, e.g., to a computer. Other embodiments are generally directed to systems and methods of making, using, or promoting such devices, kits involving such devices, and the like.
Classifications
A61N1/05 Electrodes for implantation or insertion into the body, e.g. heart electrode

patents.google.com/patent/WO2015199784A2/en


Syringe-injectable mesh electronics integrate seamlessly with minimal chronic immune response in the brain

PMID: 28533392 PMCID: PMC5468665 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1705509114

Implantation of electrical probes into the brain has been central to both neuroscience research and biomedical applications, although conventional probes induce gliosis in surrounding tissue. We recently reported ultraflexible open mesh electronics implanted into rodent brains by syringe injection that exhibit promising chronic tissue response and recording stability. Here we report time-dependent histology studies of the mesh electronics/brain-tissue interface obtained from sections perpendicular and parallel to probe long axis, as well as studies of conventional flexible thin-film probes. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of the perpendicular and parallel brain slices containing mesh electronics showed that the distribution of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons became uniform from 2-12 wk, whereas flexible thin-film probes yield a marked accumulation of astrocytes and microglia and decrease of neurons for the same period. Quantitative analyses of 4- and 12-wk data showed that the signals for neurons, axons, astrocytes, and microglia are nearly the same from the mesh electronics surface to the baseline far from the probes, in contrast to flexible polymer probes, which show decreases in neuron and increases in astrocyte and microglia signals. Notably, images of sagittal brain slices containing nearly the entire mesh electronics probe showed that the tissue interface was uniform and neurons and neurofilaments penetrated through the mesh by 3 mo postimplantation. The minimal immune response and seamless interface with brain tissue postimplantation achieved by ultraflexible open mesh electronics probes provide substantial advantages and could enable a wide range of opportunities for in vivo chronic recording and modulation of brain activity in the future.

Keywords: brain–machine interface; in vivo implants; minimal neuroinflammation; neural probes; ultraflexible macroporous probes.

pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28533392/


METHODS AND SYSTEMS OFPRIORITIZING TREATMENTS , VACCINATION , TESTING AND / OR ACTIVITIES WHILE PROTECTING THE PRIVACY OF INDIVIDUALS

patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/04/24/12/7c8e8238f4ae9d/US20210082583A1.pdf

Kary Mullis – full interview from 1996 (“You can’t expect the sheep to really respect the best & the brightest”)

Download as *.Mp3


Related posts:

PCR-test cannot be used to diagnose Covid (or any other viral) infections

Nobel laureate Kary Mullis on “global warming”

Psycholinguistics: The etymology of the word “kid”

kid (n.)
c. 1200, “the young of a goat,” from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse kið “young goat,” from Proto-Germanic *kidjom (source also of Old High German kizzi, German kitze, Danish and Swedish kid).

In clothing, “made of soft leather,” as though from the skin of a kid, but commercially often of other skins. Hence kid glove “a glove made of kidskin leather” is from 1680s; sense of “characterized by wearing kid gloves,” therefore “dainty, delicate” is from 1856.

Source: www.etymonline.com/word/kid

Rudolf Steiner on “spiritual vaccination” (1917)

“Just don’t fool yourself. One stands before a quite certain movement. Just as the spirit was abolished at that Council in Constantinople, that is, as it was dogmatically determined: Man consists only of body and soul, to speak of a spirit is heretical -, so one will strive in another form to abolish the soul, the life of the soul. And the time will come, perhaps not at all in the distant future, when at such a congress as the one that took place in 1912, something quite different will develop, when quite different tendencies will appear, when one will say: It is already morbid in man, if he even thinks about spirit and soul. Only those people are healthy who only talk about the body. – It will be regarded as a symptom of illness if man develops in such a way that he can come to the concept: There is a spirit or a soul. – These will be sick people. And one will find – you can be quite sure – the corresponding remedy through which one will work. At that time one abolished the spirit. The soul will be abolished by a medicine. Out of a “healthy view” one will find a vaccine by which the organism will be worked on in such a way in the earliest possible youth, if possible right at birth, that this human body will not come to the thought: There is a soul and a spirit. – This is how sharply the two world-view currents will confront each other. The one will have to think about how concepts and ideas are to be formed so that they can cope with the real reality, the reality of the spirit and the soul. The other, the successors of today’s materialists, will look for the vaccine that will make the body “healthy”, that is, make it so that this body, through its constitution, no longer talks of such silly things as soul and spirit, but talks “healthy” of the forces that live in machines and chemistry, that constitute planets and suns in the nebula of the world. This will be brought about by physical procedures. The materialistic physicians will be given the task of expelling the souls from mankind. Yes, those who believe that one can see into the future with playful concepts, they are very much mistaken. With serious, thorough, deep concepts one must look into the future. Spiritual science is not a gimmick, is not merely a theory, but spiritual science is a real duty towards the development of mankind.”

~RUDOLF STEINER (Collected Works; page 97-98)

rudolf steiner gesammelte werke

Wicked problems: The “halting problem” in the social domain


In planning and policy, a wicked problem is a problem that is difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements that are often difficult to recognize. It refers to an idea or problem that cannot be fixed, where there is no single solution to the problem; and “wicked” denotes resistance to resolution, rather than evil. Another definition is “a problem whose social complexity means that it has no determinable stopping point”.Moreover, because of complex interdependencies, the effort to solve one aspect of a wicked problem may reveal or create other problems. Due to their complexity, wicked problems are often characterized by organized irresponsibility.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_problem


Lönngren, J., & van Poeck, K.. (2021). Wicked problems: a mapping review of the literature. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/13504509.2020.1859415
DOI URL
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Grewatsch, S., Kennedy, S., & Bansal, P.. (2021). Tackling wicked problems in strategic management with systems thinking. Strategic Organization

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/14761270211038635
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Alford, J., & Head, B. W.. (2017). Wicked and less wicked problems: A typology and a contingency framework. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2017.1361634
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Schiefloe, P. M.. (2021). The Corona crisis: a wicked problem. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/1403494820970767
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Termeer, C. J. A. M., Dewulf, A., & Biesbroek, R.. (2019). A critical assessment of the wicked problem concept: relevance and usefulness for policy science and practice. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2019.1617971
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Hoffman, J., Pelzer, P., Albert, L., Béneker, T., Hajer, M., & Mangnus, A.. (2021). A futuring approach to teaching wicked problems. Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/03098265.2020.1869923
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Walls, H. L.. (2018). Wicked problems and a “wicked” solution. Globalization and Health

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1186/s12992-018-0353-x
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Peters, B. G., & Tarpey, M.. (2019). Are wicked problems really so wicked? Perceptions of policy problems. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2019.1626595
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Peters, B. G.. (2017). What is so wicked about wicked problems? A conceptual analysis and a research program. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2017.1361633
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King, R.. (2021). On Europe, Immigration and Inequality: Brexit as a ‘Wicked Problem’. Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/15562948.2020.1821275
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Dentoni, D., Bitzer, V., & Schouten, G.. (2018). Harnessing Wicked Problems in Multi-stakeholder Partnerships. Journal of Business Ethics

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1007/s10551-018-3858-6
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Niskanen, V. P., Rask, M., & Raisio, H.. (2021). Wicked Problems in Africa: A Systematic Literature Review. SAGE Open

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/21582440211032163
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Turnbull, N., & Hoppe, R.. (2019). Problematizing ‘wickedness’: a critique of the wicked problems concept, from philosophy to practice. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1488796
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Head, B. W.. (2019). Forty years of wicked problems literature: forging closer links to policy studies. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1488797
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Termeer, C. J. A. M., & Dewulf, A.. (2019). A small wins framework to overcome the evaluation paradox of governing wicked problems. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1497933
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Head, B. W., & Alford, J.. (2015). Wicked Problems: Implications for Public Policy and Management. Administration and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/0095399713481601
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Thollander, P., Palm, J., & Hedbrant, J.. (2019). Energy efficiency as a wicked problem. Sustainability (Switzerland)

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/su11061569
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Sediri, S., Trommetter, M., Frascaria-Lacoste, N., & Fernandez-Manjarrés, J.. (2020). Transformability as a wicked problem: A cautionary tale?. Sustainability (Switzerland)

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/SU12155895
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Frey-Heger, C., Gatzweiler, M. K., & Hinings, C. R.. (2021). No End In Sight: How regimes form barriers to addressing the wicked problem of displacement. Organization Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/01708406211044869
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Mason, T. H. E., Pollard, C. R. J., Chimalakonda, D., Guerrero, A. M., Kerr-Smith, C., Milheiras, S. A. G., … Bunnefeld, N.. (2018). Wicked conflict: Using wicked problem thinking for holistic management of conservation conflict. Conservation Letters

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/conl.12460
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Daviter, F.. (2017). Coping, taming or solving: alternative approaches to the governance of wicked problems. Policy Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/01442872.2017.1384543
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Crosby, A., Dunn, J. L., Aditjondro, E., & Rachfiansyah. (2019). Tobacco Control Is a Wicked Problem: Situating Design Responses in Yogyakarta and Banjarmasin. She Ji

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.sheji.2019.09.001
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Smith, K. J.. (2022). Wicked Problems in Pharmacy Education. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Plain numerical DOI: 10.5688/ajpe8491
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Zhang, J., & Kim, Y.. (2016). Digital government and wicked problems: Solution or problem?. Information Polity

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3233/IP-160395
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Jentoft, S., & Chuenpagdee, R.. (2009). Fisheries and coastal governance as a wicked problem. Marine Policy

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2008.12.002
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