Quotations

Without freedom of thought, there can be no such thing as wisdom – and no such thing as public liberty without freedom of speech.

— Benjamin Franklin

Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.

— Henry David Thoreau

It’s Easier to Fool People Than to Convince Them That They Have Been Fooled.

— ascribed to Mark Twain

Freedom is the freedom to say 2+2=4. If that is granted, all else follows.

— George Orwell

If the general public doesn’t understand science and technology, then who is making all of the decisions about science and technology that are going to determine what kind of future our children live in, some members of congress? There are only a handful who have any background in science at all, and some of them don’t even want to know about it.

— Carl Sagan

The serious threat to our democracy is not the existence of foreign totalitarian states. It is the existence within our own personal attitudes and within our own institutions of conditions similar to those which have given a victory to external authority, discipline, uniformity and dependence upon the Leader in foreign countries. The battlefield is accordingly here -within ourselves and our institutions […].

— John Dewey

… the understanding of the reasons for the totalitarian flight from freedom is a premise for any action which aims at the victory over the totalitarian forces.

— Erich Fromm

As political and economic freedom diminishes, sexual freedom tends compensating to increase. And the dictator (unless he needs cannon fodder and families with which to colonize empty or conquered territories) will do well to encourage that freedom. In conjunction with the freedom to daydream under the influence of dope and movies and the radio, it will help to reconcile his subjects to the servitude which is their fate.

— Aldous Huxley

“Sometimes the only moral choice is to break the law. Germans know this far better than any other country.”

— Edward Snowden

The voice of the majority is no proof of justice.

— Friedrich Schiller

“You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.”

— Abraham Lincoln

“People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.”

— Søren Kierkegaard

“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves”

— Abraham Lincoln

“What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or in the holy name of liberty or democracy?”

— Mahatma Gandhi

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”

— George Orwell

“For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”

— Nelson Mandela

“People have only as much liberty as they have the intelligence to want and the courage to take.”

— Emma Goldman

“Those who expect to reap the blessings of freedom, must, like men, undergo the fatigues of supporting it.”

— Thomas Paine

“Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it.”

— George Bernard Shaw

Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.”

— John Milton

“The price of freedom is eternal vigilance.”

— John Philpot Curran

“The advancement and diffusion of knowledge is the only guardian of true liberty.”

— James Madison

“If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.”

— John Stuart Mill

“Until we are all free, we are none of us free.”

— Emma Lazarus

“The man who does not do his own thinking is a slave, and is a traitor to himself and to his fellowmen.”

— Robert Ingersoll

“You assist an administration most effectively by obeying its orders and decrees. An evil administration never deserves such allegiance. Allegiance to it means partaking of the evil. A good man will therefore resist an evil system or administration with his whole soul.”

— Mahatma Gandhi

“Truth is belligerent. Truth is, by its very nature, at war with the forces of falsehood and deceit.”

— Bertolt Brecht

“THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated.”

— Thomas Paine

There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting.

— Buddha

The dark ages still reign over all humanity, and the depth and persistence of this domination are only now becoming clear. This Dark Ages prison has no steel bars, chains, or locks. Instead, it is locked by misorientation and built of misinformation. Caught up in a plethora of conditioned reflexes and driven by the human ego, both warden and prisoner attempt meagerly to compete with God. All are intractably skeptical of what they do not understand. We are powerfully imprisoned in these Dark Ages simply by the terms in which we have been conditioned to think.

— R. Buckminster Fuller

“In every declining civilization there is a small “remnant” of people who adhere to the right against the wrong; who recognize the difference between good and evil and who will take an active stand for the former and against the latter; who can still think and discern and who will courageously take a stand against the political, social, moral, and spiritual rot or decay of their day.”

— Donald S. McAlvaney

“No people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauched in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.”

— Samuel Adams

If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be.

— Thomas Jefferson

“To be GOVERNED is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be GOVERNED is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be place[d] under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.”

— Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

“The word sovereignty implies self-governance. A sovereign does not have a government external to himself. Meaning that we shouldn’t care about who’s in what office or not in what office, or whether it’s a de jure government, or a de facto government — they’re all irrelevant because sovereign people are 100% responsible for their own existence — and I’m not saying they don’t work together, I’m saying that they are whole people that have taken the burden of their existence off the rest of the planet. That’s sovereignty.”

— Kurt Kallenbach

“Fear is the passion of slaves.”

— Patrick Henry

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.”

— Samuel Adams

“It does not take a majority to prevail … but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.”

— Samuel Adams

“A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.”

— Samuel Adams

“The liberties of our country, the freedoms of our civil Constitution are worth defending at all hazards; it is our duty to defend them against all attacks. We have received them as a fair inheritance from our worthy ancestors. They purchased them for us with toil and danger and expense of treasure and blood. It will bring a mark of everlasting infamy on the present generation – enlightened as it is – if we should suffer them to be wrested from us by violence without a struggle, or to be cheated out of them by the artifices of designing men.”

— Samuel Adams

“Nil desperandum, — Never Despair. That is a motto for you and me. All are not dead; and where there is a spark of patriotic fire, we will rekindle it.”

— Samuel Adams

“Nothing is more essential to the establishment of manners in a State than that all persons employed in places of power and trust must be men of unexceptionable characters.”

— Samuel Adams

“How strangely will the Tools of a Tyrant pervert the plain Meaning of Words!”

— Samuel Adams

The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.

— Plato
Top