The German term for government is "Regierung", or alternatively "Gubernative". In Latin, "Gubernaculum" refers to a steering oar or a rudder. The "Ship of State" metaphor was put forth by Plato in his Res Publica (lat.: Politea) ≈ 380 BC. It likens the governance of a city-state to the command of a naval vessel and ultimately argues that the only human beings qualified to be the steersmen of this ship are philosopher kings who possesses both a love of wisdom, as well as intelligence, reliability, and a willingness to live a simple life, viz., benevolent men with absolute power who have access to the "the idea of the good" (ἡ τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ ἰδέα). Plato writes: "philosophers [must] become kings…or those now called kings [must] … genuinely and adequately philosophize." The term cybernetics was also utilized by Plato in the context of "the study of self-governance" in the Alcibiades to signify the governance of people.
Likewise, kubernētikós translates as “good at steering” from κυβερνάω (kubernáō, “I steer, guide”). In English, the term Cybernetics was coined by U.S. mathematician Norbert Wiener in 1948. The term Cybernetics is etymologically derived from the Greek κυβερνήτης (cybernḗtēs) "steersman, rudder, governor". In French, the term "Cybernétique" was first introduced by the physicist and mathematician André-Marie Ampère in 1834 his Essai sur la philosophie des sciences in order to refer to the application of science to civil government.

References
1578, Henri Estienne (ed.), Platonis opera quae extant omnia, Vol. 2.

1834, Ampère André-Marie, Essai sur la philosophie des sciences, ou Exposition analytique d'une classification naturelle de toutes les connaissances humaines. Paris.

1948, Norbert Wiener, Cybernetics: Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. Paris, (Hermann & Cie) & Camb. Mass. (MIT Press) ISBN 978-0-262-73009-9; 2nd revised ed. 1961.

1950, Norbert Wiener, The Human Use of Human Beings. The Riverside Press (Houghton Mifflin Co.).

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The German term for government is “Regierung”, or alternatively “Gubernative”. In Latin, “Gubernaculum” refers to a steering oar or a rudder. The “Ship of State” metaphor was put forth by Plato in his Res Publica (lat.: Politea) ≈ 380 BC. It likens the governance of a city-state to the command of a naval vessel and ultimately argues that the only human beings qualified to be the captain of this ship are philosopher kings who possesses both a love of wisdom, as well as intelligence, reliability, and a willingness to live a simple life, viz., benevolent men with absolute power who have access to the “the idea of the good” (ἡ τοῦ ἀγαθοῦ ἰδέα). Plato writes: “philosophers [must] become kings…or those now called kings [must] … genuinely and adequately philosophize.”
Likewise, kubernētikós translates as “good at steering, good pilot” from κυβερνάω (kubernáō, “I steer, drive, guide, act as a pilot”). In English, the term Cybernetics was coined by U.S. mathematician Norbert Wiener in 1948. The term Cybernetics is derived from the Greek κυβερνήτης (cybernḗtēs) “steersman, rudder, governor”. In French, the term “Cybernétique” was first introduced by the physicist and mathematician André-Marie Ampère in 1834 his Essai sur la philosophie des sciences in order to refer to the application of science to civil government.

References
Henri Estienne (ed.), Platonis opera quae extant omnia, Vol. 2, 1578.

1948, Cybernetics: Or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine. Paris, (Hermann & Cie) & Camb. Mass. (MIT Press) ISBN 978-0-262-73009-9; 2nd revised ed. 1961.

1950, The Human Use of Human Beings. The Riverside Press (Houghton Mifflin Co.).

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