Kary Mullis – full interview from 1996 (“You can’t expect the sheep to really respect the best & the brightest”)

www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/1993/mullis/facts/

Download as *.Mp3

The HIV Hoax: 2000 Virologists Cannot Be Wrong
www.goodreads.com/book/show/27608798-the-hiv-hoax

Dr. Kary Mullis, Biochemist, 1993 Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Dr. Kary Mullis “If there is evidence that HIV causes AIDS, there should be scientific documents which either singly or collectively demonstrate that fact, at least with a high probability. There is no such document.” (Sunday Times (London) 28 nov. 1993) Dr. Heinz Ludwig Sanger, Emeritus Professor of Molecular Biology and Virology, Max-Planck-Institutes for Biochemy, Munchen. Robert Koch Award 1978: “Up to today there is actually no single scientifically really convincing evidence for the existence of HIV. Not even once such a retrovirus has been isolated and purified by the methods of classical virology.” (Letter to Suddeutsche Zeitung 2000) Dr. Serge Lang, Professor of Mathematics, Yale University: “I do not regard the causal relationship between HIV and any disease as settled. I have seen considerable evidence that highly improper statistics concerning HIV and AIDS have been passed off as science, and that top members of the scientific establishment have carelessly, if not irresponsible, joined the media in spreading misinformation about the nature of AIDS.” (Yale Scientific, Fall 1994) Dr. Harry Rubin, Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley: Prof. Harry Rubin “It is not proven that AIDS is caused by HIV infection, nor is it proven that it plays no role whatever in the syndrome.” (Sunday Times (London) 3 April 1994) Dr. Richard Strohman, Emeritus Professor of Cell Biology at the University of California at Berkeley: “In the old days it was required that a scientist address the possibilities of proving his hypothesis wrong as well as right. Now there’s none of that in standard HIV-AIDS program with all its billions of dollars.” (Penthouse April 1994) Dr. Harvey Bialy, Molecular Biologist, former editor of Bio/Technology and Nature Biotechnology: Harvey Bialy “HIV is an ordinary retrovirus. There is nothing about this virus that is unique. Everything that is discovered about HIV has an analogue in other retroviruses that don’t cause AIDS. HIV only contains a very small piece of genetic information. There’s no way it can do all these elaborate things they say it does.” (Spin June 1992) Dr. Roger Cunningham, Immunologist, Microbiologist and Director of the Centre for Immunology at the State University of New York at Buffalo: “Unfortunately, an AIDS ‘establishment’ seems to have formed that intends to discourage challenges to the dogma on one side and often insists on following discredited ideas on the other.” (Sunday Times (London) 3 April 1994) Dr. Gordon Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Public Health, University of Glasgow: Prof. Gordon Stwart “AIDS is a behavioural disease. It is multifactorial, brought on by several simultaneous strains on the immune system – drugs, pharmaceutical and recreational, sexually transmitted diseases, multiple viral infections.” (Spin June 1992) Dr. Alfred Hassig, (1921-1999), former Professor of Immunology at the University of Bern, and former director Swiss Red Cross blood banks: Prof. Alfred Hassig “The sentence of death accompanying the medical diagnosis of AIDS should be abolished.” (Sunday Times (London) 3 April 1994) Dr. Charles Thomas, former Professor of Biochemistry, Harvard and John Hopkins Universities: “The HIV-causes-AIDS dogma represents the grandest and perhaps the most morally destructive fraud that has ever been perpetrated on young men and women of the Western world.” (Sunday Times (London) 3 April 1994) Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, New York Physician, founder of the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR): Joe Sonnabend “The marketing of HIV, through press releases and statements, as a killer virus causing AIDS without the need for any other factors, has so distorted research and treatment that it may have caused thousands of people to suffer and die.”

Related posts:

PCR-test cannot be used to diagnose Covid (or any other viral) infections

Nobel laureate Kary Mullis on “global warming”


Brenes-Guillén, L.. (2019). Kary Mullis: padre de la técnica de la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR). Revista de Biología Tropical, 67(9), Blog.

Plain numerical DOI: 10.15517/rbt.v0i3.36951
DOI URL
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Galibert, F., & Netter, P.. (2021). Hommage à Kary Mullis. Bulletin de l’Académie Nationale de Médecine, 205(4), 383–386.

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.banm.2021.02.008
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Danilova, V. M., Matyshevska, O. P., & Komisarenko, S. V.. (2021). Nobel Prize laureate Kary Mullis and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The Ukrainian Biochemical Journal, 93(5), 122–131.

Plain numerical DOI: 10.15407/ubj93.05.122
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Psycholinguistics: The etymology of the word “kid”

kid (n.)
c. 1200, “the young of a goat,” from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse kið “young goat,” from Proto-Germanic *kidjom (source also of Old High German kizzi, German kitze, Danish and Swedish kid).

In clothing, “made of soft leather,” as though from the skin of a kid, but commercially often of other skins. Hence kid glove “a glove made of kidskin leather” is from 1680s; sense of “characterized by wearing kid gloves,” therefore “dainty, delicate” is from 1856.

Source: www.etymonline.com/word/kid

Rudolf Steiner on “spiritual vaccination” (1917)

“Just don’t fool yourself. One stands before a quite certain movement. Just as the spirit was abolished at that Council in Constantinople, that is, as it was dogmatically determined: Man consists only of body and soul, to speak of a spirit is heretical -, so one will strive in another form to abolish the soul, the life of the soul. And the time will come, perhaps not at all in the distant future, when at such a congress as the one that took place in 1912, something quite different will develop, when quite different tendencies will appear, when one will say: It is already morbid in man, if he even thinks about spirit and soul. Only those people are healthy who only talk about the body. – It will be regarded as a symptom of illness if man develops in such a way that he can come to the concept: There is a spirit or a soul. – These will be sick people. And one will find – you can be quite sure – the corresponding remedy through which one will work. At that time one abolished the spirit. The soul will be abolished by a medicine. Out of a “healthy view” one will find a vaccine by which the organism will be worked on in such a way in the earliest possible youth, if possible right at birth, that this human body will not come to the thought: There is a soul and a spirit. – This is how sharply the two world-view currents will confront each other. The one will have to think about how concepts and ideas are to be formed so that they can cope with the real reality, the reality of the spirit and the soul. The other, the successors of today’s materialists, will look for the vaccine that will make the body “healthy”, that is, make it so that this body, through its constitution, no longer talks of such silly things as soul and spirit, but talks “healthy” of the forces that live in machines and chemistry, that constitute planets and suns in the nebula of the world. This will be brought about by physical procedures. The materialistic physicians will be given the task of expelling the souls from mankind. Yes, those who believe that one can see into the future with playful concepts, they are very much mistaken. With serious, thorough, deep concepts one must look into the future. Spiritual science is not a gimmick, is not merely a theory, but spiritual science is a real duty towards the development of mankind.”

~RUDOLF STEINER (Collected Works; page 97-98)

rudolf steiner gesammelte werke

Wicked problems: The “halting problem” in the social domain


In planning and policy, a wicked problem is a problem that is difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements that are often difficult to recognize. It refers to an idea or problem that cannot be fixed, where there is no single solution to the problem; and “wicked” denotes resistance to resolution, rather than evil. Another definition is “a problem whose social complexity means that it has no determinable stopping point”.Moreover, because of complex interdependencies, the effort to solve one aspect of a wicked problem may reveal or create other problems. Due to their complexity, wicked problems are often characterized by organized irresponsibility.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_problem


Lönngren, J., & van Poeck, K.. (2021). Wicked problems: a mapping review of the literature. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/13504509.2020.1859415
DOI URL
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Grewatsch, S., Kennedy, S., & Bansal, P.. (2021). Tackling wicked problems in strategic management with systems thinking. Strategic Organization

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/14761270211038635
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Alford, J., & Head, B. W.. (2017). Wicked and less wicked problems: A typology and a contingency framework. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2017.1361634
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Schiefloe, P. M.. (2021). The Corona crisis: a wicked problem. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/1403494820970767
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Termeer, C. J. A. M., Dewulf, A., & Biesbroek, R.. (2019). A critical assessment of the wicked problem concept: relevance and usefulness for policy science and practice. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2019.1617971
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Hoffman, J., Pelzer, P., Albert, L., Béneker, T., Hajer, M., & Mangnus, A.. (2021). A futuring approach to teaching wicked problems. Journal of Geography in Higher Education

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/03098265.2020.1869923
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Walls, H. L.. (2018). Wicked problems and a “wicked” solution. Globalization and Health

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1186/s12992-018-0353-x
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Peters, B. G., & Tarpey, M.. (2019). Are wicked problems really so wicked? Perceptions of policy problems. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2019.1626595
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Peters, B. G.. (2017). What is so wicked about wicked problems? A conceptual analysis and a research program. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2017.1361633
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King, R.. (2021). On Europe, Immigration and Inequality: Brexit as a ‘Wicked Problem’. Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/15562948.2020.1821275
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Dentoni, D., Bitzer, V., & Schouten, G.. (2018). Harnessing Wicked Problems in Multi-stakeholder Partnerships. Journal of Business Ethics

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1007/s10551-018-3858-6
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Niskanen, V. P., Rask, M., & Raisio, H.. (2021). Wicked Problems in Africa: A Systematic Literature Review. SAGE Open

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/21582440211032163
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Turnbull, N., & Hoppe, R.. (2019). Problematizing ‘wickedness’: a critique of the wicked problems concept, from philosophy to practice. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1488796
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Head, B. W.. (2019). Forty years of wicked problems literature: forging closer links to policy studies. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1488797
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Termeer, C. J. A. M., & Dewulf, A.. (2019). A small wins framework to overcome the evaluation paradox of governing wicked problems. Policy and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/14494035.2018.1497933
DOI URL
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Head, B. W., & Alford, J.. (2015). Wicked Problems: Implications for Public Policy and Management. Administration and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/0095399713481601
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Thollander, P., Palm, J., & Hedbrant, J.. (2019). Energy efficiency as a wicked problem. Sustainability (Switzerland)

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/su11061569
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Sediri, S., Trommetter, M., Frascaria-Lacoste, N., & Fernandez-Manjarrés, J.. (2020). Transformability as a wicked problem: A cautionary tale?. Sustainability (Switzerland)

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/SU12155895
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Frey-Heger, C., Gatzweiler, M. K., & Hinings, C. R.. (2021). No End In Sight: How regimes form barriers to addressing the wicked problem of displacement. Organization Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/01708406211044869
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Mason, T. H. E., Pollard, C. R. J., Chimalakonda, D., Guerrero, A. M., Kerr-Smith, C., Milheiras, S. A. G., … Bunnefeld, N.. (2018). Wicked conflict: Using wicked problem thinking for holistic management of conservation conflict. Conservation Letters

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/conl.12460
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Daviter, F.. (2017). Coping, taming or solving: alternative approaches to the governance of wicked problems. Policy Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/01442872.2017.1384543
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Crosby, A., Dunn, J. L., Aditjondro, E., & Rachfiansyah. (2019). Tobacco Control Is a Wicked Problem: Situating Design Responses in Yogyakarta and Banjarmasin. She Ji

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.sheji.2019.09.001
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Smith, K. J.. (2022). Wicked Problems in Pharmacy Education. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

Plain numerical DOI: 10.5688/ajpe8491
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Zhang, J., & Kim, Y.. (2016). Digital government and wicked problems: Solution or problem?. Information Polity

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3233/IP-160395
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Jentoft, S., & Chuenpagdee, R.. (2009). Fisheries and coastal governance as a wicked problem. Marine Policy

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.marpol.2008.12.002
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Big lies: A propaganda device par excellence

The American Psychological Society (APS) defines a “big lie” as “a propaganda device in which a false statement of extreme magnitude is constantly repeated to persuade the public. The assumption is that a Big Lie is less likely to be challenged than a lesser one because people will assume that evidence exists to support a statement of such magnitude.”

According to Wikipedia, a big lie (German: große Lüge) is a gross distortion or misrepresentation of the truth, used especially as a propaganda technique.[1][2] The German expression was coined by Adolf Hitler, when he dictated his book Mein Kampf (1925), to describe the use of a lie so colossal that no one would believe that someone “could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.” Hitler claimed that the technique had been used by Jews to blame Germany’s loss in World War I on German general Erich Ludendorff, who was a prominent nationalist political leader in the Weimar Republic.
According to historian Jeffrey Herf, the Nazis used the idea of the original big lie to turn sentiment against Jews and justify the Holocaust. Herf maintains that Joseph Goebbels and the Nazi Party actually used the big lie technique that they described – and that they used it to turn long-standing antisemitism in Europe into mass murder. Herf further argues that the Nazis’ big lie was their depiction of Germany as an innocent, besieged land striking back at “international Jewry”, which the Nazis blamed for starting World War I. Nazi propaganda repeatedly claimed that Jews held power behind the scenes in Britain, Russia, and the United States. It further spread claims that the Jews had begun a war of extermination against Germany, and used these to assert that Germany had a right to annihilate the Jews in self-defense.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_lie


DiMaggio, A. R.. (2022). Conspiracy Theories and the Manufacture of Dissent: QAnon, the ‘Big Lie’, Covid-19, and the Rise of Rightwing Propaganda. Critical Sociology

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073669
DOI URL
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Geraldes, D., Heinicke, F., & Kim, D. G.. (2021). Big and small lies. Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2021.101666
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Obar, J. A., & Oeldorf-Hirsch, A.. (2020). The biggest lie on the Internet: ignoring the privacy policies and terms of service policies of social networking services. Information Communication and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2018.1486870
DOI URL
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Jacobson, G. C.. (2021). Donald Trump’s Big Lie and the Future of the Republican Party. Presidential Studies Quarterly

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/psq.12716
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Whitehead, M. A., Foste, Z., Duran, A., Tevis, T., & Cabrera, N. L.. (2021). Commentary disrupting the big lie: Higher education and whitelash in a post/colorblind era. Education Sciences

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/educsci11090486
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Martin, R. L.. (2014). The big lie of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review

Plain numerical DOI: 10.2469/dig.v44.n4.7
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Heleta, S.. (2018). Decolonizing Knowledge in South Africa: Dismantling the ‘pedagogy of big lies’. Ufahamu: A Journal of African Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.5070/f7402040942
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Canon, D. T., & Sherman, O.. (2021). Debunking the “Big Lie”: Election Administration in the 2020 Presidential Election. Presidential Studies Quarterly

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/psq.12721
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McVeigh, M.. (2020). Telling big little lies: Writing the female gothic as extended metaphor in complex television. Journal of Screenwriting

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1386/josc_00013_1
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Zenko, M.. (2016). The Big Lie About the Libyan War. Foreign Policy
Obar, J. A.. (2016). The Biggest Lie on the Internet: Ignoring the Privacy Policies and Terms of Service Policies of Social Networking Services. SSRN Electronic Journal

Plain numerical DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.2757465
DOI URL
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Katz, E.. (1992). The big lie: Human restoration of nature. Techne: Research in Philosophy and Technology
Becker, J.. (2004). The big lie. Index on Censorship

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/03064220408537333
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