Multilingual AI translation:

Big lies: A propaganda device par excellence

The American Psychological Society (APS) defines a “big lie” as “a propaganda device in which a false statement of extreme magnitude is constantly repeated to persuade the public. The assumption is that a Big Lie is less likely to be challenged than a lesser one because people will assume that evidence exists to support a statement of such magnitude.”

According to Wikipedia, a big lie (German: große Lüge) is a gross distortion or misrepresentation of the truth, used especially as a propaganda technique.[1][2] The German expression was coined by Adolf Hitler, when he dictated his book Mein Kampf (1925), to describe the use of a lie so colossal that no one would believe that someone “could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously.” Hitler claimed that the technique had been used by Jews to blame Germany’s loss in World War I on German general Erich Ludendorff, who was a prominent nationalist political leader in the Weimar Republic.
According to historian Jeffrey Herf, the Nazis used the idea of the original big lie to turn sentiment against Jews and justify the Holocaust. Herf maintains that Joseph Goebbels and the Nazi Party actually used the big lie technique that they described – and that they used it to turn long-standing antisemitism in Europe into mass murder. Herf further argues that the Nazis’ big lie was their depiction of Germany as an innocent, besieged land striking back at “international Jewry”, which the Nazis blamed for starting World War I. Nazi propaganda repeatedly claimed that Jews held power behind the scenes in Britain, Russia, and the United States. It further spread claims that the Jews had begun a war of extermination against Germany, and used these to assert that Germany had a right to annihilate the Jews in self-defense.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_lie


DiMaggio, A. R.. (2022). Conspiracy Theories and the Manufacture of Dissent: QAnon, the ‘Big Lie’, Covid-19, and the Rise of Rightwing Propaganda. Critical Sociology

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073669
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Geraldes, D., Heinicke, F., & Kim, D. G.. (2021). Big and small lies. Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2021.101666
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Obar, J. A., & Oeldorf-Hirsch, A.. (2020). The biggest lie on the Internet: ignoring the privacy policies and terms of service policies of social networking services. Information Communication and Society

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2018.1486870
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Jacobson, G. C.. (2021). Donald Trump’s Big Lie and the Future of the Republican Party. Presidential Studies Quarterly

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/psq.12716
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Whitehead, M. A., Foste, Z., Duran, A., Tevis, T., & Cabrera, N. L.. (2021). Commentary disrupting the big lie: Higher education and whitelash in a post/colorblind era. Education Sciences

Plain numerical DOI: 10.3390/educsci11090486
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Martin, R. L.. (2014). The big lie of strategic planning. Harvard Business Review

Plain numerical DOI: 10.2469/dig.v44.n4.7
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Heleta, S.. (2018). Decolonizing Knowledge in South Africa: Dismantling the ‘pedagogy of big lies’. Ufahamu: A Journal of African Studies

Plain numerical DOI: 10.5070/f7402040942
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Canon, D. T., & Sherman, O.. (2021). Debunking the “Big Lie”: Election Administration in the 2020 Presidential Election. Presidential Studies Quarterly

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1111/psq.12721
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McVeigh, M.. (2020). Telling big little lies: Writing the female gothic as extended metaphor in complex television. Journal of Screenwriting

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1386/josc_00013_1
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Zenko, M.. (2016). The Big Lie About the Libyan War. Foreign Policy
Obar, J. A.. (2016). The Biggest Lie on the Internet: Ignoring the Privacy Policies and Terms of Service Policies of Social Networking Services. SSRN Electronic Journal

Plain numerical DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.2757465
DOI URL
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Katz, E.. (1992). The big lie: Human restoration of nature. Techne: Research in Philosophy and Technology
Becker, J.. (2004). The big lie. Index on Censorship

Plain numerical DOI: 10.1080/03064220408537333
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